MAKING MEETINGS LESS PAINFUL - ONE WORK SESSION AT A TIME - PAGE TWO

Fig. 1.   Click here for a .pdf  - great to bring into meetings as a reminder of OPO.

Fig. 1. Click here for a .pdf - great to bring into meetings as a reminder of OPO.

The first step determines who owns the work session. In this example, although I own the overall meeting, I’m not the best person to lead a work session on marketing. I would assign ownership of this session to Pat, who is leading the marketing effort for our mentoring program. It then becomes Pat’s responsibility to develop the work session OPO.

Let’s review the three key elements of the work session design one by one.

OBJECTIVES

An objective articulates why the work session is needed and indicates the general direction the session will take. It should be aligned with the overall direction of the meeting.

Typically, an objective will fit into one of six categories:

  1. Information Sharing: presenting, informing, explaining, notifying, updating

  2. Idea Generating: brainstorming, exploring, conceptualizing, visioning

  3. Planning: forecasting, preparing, scheduling, organizing

  4. Problem Solving: analyzing, assessing, evaluating, deciphering, resolving

  5. Decision Making: selecting, approving, agreeing, committing

  6. Producing: developing, producing, building, crafting

For the marketing work session, Pat has two objectives:

1. Update the team on the results of the mentoring lunch and learns (Information Sharing)

2. Approve the layout and content for the mentoring flyer (Decision Making)

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