MAKING MEETINGS LESS PAINFUL - ONE WORK SESSION AT A TIME - PAGE FOUR

Fig. 3 , Examples of activities corresponding to objectives and outcomes.

Fig. 3, Examples of activities corresponding to objectives and outcomes.

PROCESS

The final step in the OPO is Process. Once you’ve identified an outcome, you can go back and define the process you’ll use to achieve that outcome. This includes outlining the specific activities that will take place, the individuals who will engage in those activities, and how long you expect the activities to take.

Here are a few examples of activities that correspond with the objectives and outcomes defined earlier (Fig. 3)

This list (Fig. 3) is far from exhaustive; there are countless different activities you can engage in during work sessions. Once you’re clear on your objectives and outcomes, try doing a Google search for relevant options—e.g., various types of brainstorming methods, decision-making protocols, or creative problem-solving techniques. Without a clearly articulated process, many groups default to having loosely defined, unstructured discussions, which often aren’t the best way to achieve results.

Below is a full OPO for Pat’s marketing work session, with the Process component completed:

Mastering Meetings with OPO article - OPO example.jpg
 

The next time you plan a meeting or an individual work session, I encourage you to try applying the OPO framework. See what happens to your effectiveness and efficiency when everyone in the room is clear, right from the beginning, about exactly why you’re meeting, what the session will result in, and how you’re going to get there.

There’s wisdom in the old saying that sometimes you need to slow down to speed up. By investing a little extra planning time up front, you can help make your meetings not only more productive, but a lot more satisfying and enjoyable as well.

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